MAKING AND SHARING WORK

It's so easy to post our work online nowadays. It can take few seconds to put ourselves out there. To share our work, our perspective through our own unique language. For some it may be pictures, for others music or lyrics. I find my passions through photography and one of the themes I have been focusing on with my camera is music and musicians.
Having photographed them for years I am grateful to all those who let me in to their rehearsing studios and who allowed me to capture them in their element on stage. Knowingly or just through the spontaneity of the moment. 

One image that I rediscovered recently came from the Acid Mothers Temple gig at Sneaky Pete's in Edinburgh, late 2017.
When Higashi Hiroshi overtook the sound waves with his fingers and a theremin it made me realise how photographers and musicians practices relate to one another. It always fascinated me knowing that an artist tried many instruments, different music genres, techniques, new and old processes and approaches to arrive at their own. Perhaps that is the way to finding your instrument, one that fits the body and senses perfectly. Many proficient creatives go to the extend of creating their own thing, sometimes it's completely new and sometimes a hybrid of already familiar things. 

This 'revelation' helped me settle a little more peacefully in my own practice.  I love trying old techniques, seeing where photography actually came from. By getting better at the hands on processes I am able to understand my field much better and even if I can't see yet how I fit into this beautifully creative world, I am able to note down the areas which stimulate my senses. 

Acid Mothers Temple Portrait-9685.jpg


When Higashi Hiroshi overtook the sound waves with his fingers and a theremin it made me realise how photographers and musicians practices relate to one another. It always fascinated me knowing that an artist tried many instruments, different music genres, techniques, new and old processes and approaches to arrive at their own. Perhaps that is the way to finding your instrument, one that fits the body and senses perfectly. Many proficient creatives go to the extend of creating their own thing, sometimes it's completely new and sometimes a hybrid of already familiar things. 

This 'revelation' helped me settle a little more peacefully in my own practice.  I love trying old techniques, seeing where photography actually came from. By getting better at the hands on processes I am able to understand my field much better and even if I can't see yet how I fit into this beautifully creative world, I am able to note down the areas which stimulate my senses. 

“We look for reassurance not revelation. â€

— Bill Brandt

Some might argue this inconsistent approach is a waste of time or lack of direction but what I see is a constant discovery that is already laying a path. Not knowing where it's going is not the worst or thing to focus on. I appreciate the possibilities and only wish I had a continuous motivation to doing all the things I want to experience. That is how we realise our own potential, through our own language and our own revelations.